Videos

Fred Sharon – Tarakan

Fred Sharon – Homecoming

Bryan Wearne – Proud to be a sailor

Bryan Wearne – Nightmares

Bryan Wearne – Kamikaze

Bob Cowper – Emergency landing in the Sahara desert

Bob Cowper – D Day from the air

Bob Cowper – A fairly shakey do

Bill Purdy – Crewing up

Ron Houghton – 1,000 bomber raids

Bill Purdy & Ron Houghton – Amazingly versatile force

Bill Purdy & Ron Houghton – VE Day

Bill Purdy – Three minutes late

Bill Purdy – The mother country's in trouble

Bill Purdy – D Day 'An endless row of boats'

During the Vietnam War, Australian soldiers encountered thousands of hidden underground enemy bunkers. Murray Blake recounts the dangerous work of clearing them.

The song I Was Only Nineteen captured the experience of Australia’s Vietnam veterans and helped communicate to Australian society what many veterans themselves had been unable to share.

Stuart Smith was a young child when his father, Bernard Lyle Smith, was killed in action in Vietnam, but it was some years before the sense of loss began to sink in. For Janice, now raising two sons on her own, the connection to her husband Bernie remained strong.

Bill served in Vietnam commanding armoured personnel carriers in support of infantry. One day, their luck ran out.

Gail married a recently returned Vietnam Veteran who many years later was hospitalised by post-traumatic stress disorder. Frustrated by a lack of recognition of what she had found to be a common experience of veteran’s families, Gail returned to university research the problem, attaining a PhD in Psychology.

Bill Kane served in Vietnam War with the Royal Australian Navy on HMAS Sydney. Bill had the experience of transporting troops both to Vietnam and home to Australia, noticing a pronounced change in the men.

Graham Edwards served with the Australian Army in Vietnam. He was warned that the biggest danger would be landlines. In May 1970, Graham’s life was forever changed when he stepped on a ‘jumping jack’ mine while out on patrol.

Graham Edwards served with the Australian Army in Vietnam. He was warned that the biggest danger would be landlines. In May 1970, Graham’s life was forever changed when he stepped on a ‘jumping jack’ mine while out on patrol.

Bob Hall commanded a platoon during the Vietnam War. It was a heavy responsibility. After a long army career, he entered academic life and discovered through his research a way to give something back to the people of Vietnam.

Gary Beck flew Canberra bombers with the Royal Australian Airforce in Vietnam. They flew low-level missions that required accurate flying.

Colleen Mealy worked as an Australian Army nurse in Vietnam. Conditions were basic, but they were dedicated to their patients.

Peter Condon was a fighter pilot with the Royal Australian Air Force who found himself flying in Vietnam as a forward air controller, directing air attacks in support of ground troops.

As a national serviceman, Neil Weekes commanded a platoon in Vietnam during the battles for the two fire support bases, Coral and Balmoral. After returning to civilian life in Australia, he chose to re-enter the Army.

As a national serviceman, Neil Weekes commanded a platoon in Vietnam during the battles for the two fire support bases, Coral and Balmoral. After returning to civilian life in Australia, he chose to re-enter the Army.

Graham Walker served as an infantry commander in Vietnam. After the war he fought for recognition of Agent Orange as a cause of cancers in veterans.

Robert Connor flew transport aircraft in Vietnam. It was an important and varied role transporting everything from ammunition to livestock.

Prior to serving two tours in Vietnam, Roy Mundine had served in Malaya in 1959. He was mentioned in dispatches in 1969 when he had continued to command his section after being severely wounded by a mine and until he could safely be reached. He later became the Australian Army’s first Indigenous Elder.

Neil Ralph served with the Royal Australian Navy Helicopter Flight Vietnam. After the war he continued a distinguished career with the Navy.

Barry Heard served in Vietnam in 1967 as a national serviceman. After many years he suffered a breakdown and was diagnosed with severe post-traumatic stress disorder. Supported by his family he recovered and wrote a successful book about his life and experiences.

Gary McKay went to Vietnam as a national serviceman and commanded an infantry platoon. He saw battle first hand.

Bob O’Neill served as an intelligence officer in Vietnam. His work in counter-insurgency took him out into Vietnamese villages gathering intelligence.

Arthur Law served as an infantryman in Vietnam and observed firsthand the different tactical approaches used by the Americans and the Australians.

Neville Wiggins served in Vietnam with the Royal Australian Air Force. He saw action as a helicopter door gunner.

Peter Jarratt served with the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam, the first Australian unit to arrive, the last to leave, and the most highly decorated of the Vietnam War.

Col Elliott served with the Royal Australian Navy on HMAS Hobart, as part of the ‘gun line’ providing naval gun support to ground forces.

Donald Barnby served with the Special Air Service Regiment in Vietnam. Like many, he found the rapid transition from the battlefield back to Australia difficult to adjust to.

Wayne Brown was called up for National Service and went to Vietnam as a medic. He was awarded the Military Medal for bravery.

As a young man, Dave Sabben commanded an infantry platoon in Vietnam.

Tony Ey served as a Royal Australian Navy Clearance Diver in Vietnam. Like many Australian units, his was integrated closely with the Americans.

Jim Richmond served with the Australian Army in Vietnam, and in 1966 was wounded during the Battle of Long Tan.

Howard Dillon served in Vietnam as a Chaplain in the Australian Army, providing pastoral care to his fellow soldiers. He found himself confronted by the realities of war.

Chinese Anzacs

This short documentary includes interviews and family perspectives from some of the descendants of Chinese Anzacs. The film is designed to accompany the Department of Veterans’ Affairs publication Chinese Anzacs, which sheds light on the individual experiences and challenges of being a soldier of Chinese ancestry.

Roy Cornford – Prisoner on the Burma Thailand Railway

Roy Cornford – Sinking of the Rakuyo Maru – Part 4

Roy Cornford – Sinking of the Rakuyo Maru – Part 3

Roy Cornford – Sinking of the Rakuyo Maru – Part 2

Roy Cornford – Sinking of the Rakuyo Maru – Part 1

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